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Survey - Social Impacts of COVID-19 on Animal Health Workers

September 20, 2020

My name is Valerie Hongoh and I am a postdoctoral researcher from the University of Montreal working with Cécile Aenishaenslin (DMV and assistant professor) and a larger team of researchers on a project interested in understanding the social impacts of COVID-19 on animal health workers (veterinary technicians/technologists and veterinarians).

I am contacting you to invite you to take part in a research survey on the experiences of animal health workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. The goal of the survey is to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices of this group of workers and understand how the emergency measures that were put into place during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic may have impacted the stress and quality of life this group of workers.

Your responses will remain anonymous and no personally identifying information will be stored with your survey responses. Participation in this study will take approximately 15-25 minutes of your time.

Once you have completed the survey, you will be invited to enter a random draw to win a 50$ gift certificate of your choice. Ten (10) gift certificates will be drawn among participants. Furthermore, if you wish, we will invite you to participate in the second phase of the study in late fall 2020 by filling out a second research survey that will allow us to follow the ongoing impact of the situation on animal health workers.

To participate in the research survey, please use the following link: https://fmv-umontreal.limequery.com/835583?newtest=Y&lang=en

The survey website, LimeSurvey, will ask you to register so that we may have a means to contact you again in the fall.

Your contribution to this work is very important to us! This research will allow us to improve our understanding of the effects of the pandemic on animal health workers and to implement appropriate measures.

Sincerely,
Valerie Hongoh
(valerie.hongoh@umontreal.ca)
On behalf of the research team