CVMA | CVMA Summit
CVMA-ACMV

CVMA Summit

The CVMA Summit is an annual forum where Canadian and international veterinary leaders share information on key issues in veterinary medicine. Discussions that take place during the Summit have proven to be invaluable in exploring and adopting common approaches to the challenges our profession faces. All CVMA Convention delegates are eligible to attend this event, which is hosted annually during the CVMA Convention.

2019 CVMA Global Summit: The Gold Standard of Animal Welfare – Positive and Negative Impact on Animals and Veterinarians

All Sessions Level 1 RACE

Speakers: 

Dr. Susan Hazel, Senior Lecturer, Animal Behaviour, Welfare & Ethics, Australia
Session Title: Global Animal Welfare: Challenges and Opportunities
Dr. David Fraser, Professor, Faculty of Land and Food Systems, University of British Columbia
Session Title: What do we mean by one welfare? 
Dr. Heather Bacon, University of Edinburgh
Session Title: The Gold Standard of Animal Welfare - Positive and Negative Impact on Animals and Veterinarians

View speaker bios here.

Session Title: Global Animal Welfare: Challenges and Opportunities

Dr. Susan Hazel, Senior Lecturer, Animal Behaviour, Welfare & Ethics, Australia

In our global village we are increasingly made aware of animal welfare challenges in every region - urban or rural, highly populated or isolated. Some of these are common to many regions, such as the online trade in pets and exotic animals, long distance transportation of animals, and the animal welfare costs of intensive agriculture. While the internet presents risks to animals, such as in online trade, it also presents the opportunity to highlight to the public major risks to the welfare of animals welfare, generating media attention that can change practices. This has occurred in recent years against the dog meat trade; use of electric collars in dog training, and; cosmetic procedures such as declawing in cats and tail docking and ear cropping in dogs. Increased communication between animal welfare scientists and policy makers presents the opportunity to share strategies that work (or do not work) hence helping animals across the globe. Development of international guidelines, such as the World Small Animal Veterinary Association Animal Welfare Guidelines, also plays an important role. Finally, the last 20 years has seen a dramatic increase in the level of animal welfare and behaviour education provided to veterinary and animal science students. While there are many pressing challenges in animal welfare, a global approach offers many opportunities for incremental improvements in our treatment of animals.

Session Title: What do we mean by one welfare? 

Dr. David Fraser, Professor, Faculty of Land and Food Systems, University of British Columbia

Human welfare and animal welfare are closely related. This session will highlight the importance of veterinary and animal protection services working with human welfare services in case such as disaster relief, the role of human mental health in animal care especially regarding hoarding and neglect, and some examples around the world of how improving animal welfare contributes to human welfare.”

Session Title: The Gold Standard of Animal Welfare - Positive and Negative Impact on Animals and Veterinarians

Dr. Heather Bacon, University of Edinburgh

Animal welfare is an area of increasing interest to the global veterinary community – in many places around the world, veterinarians are expected to be advocates for the good welfare of animals, but this expectation also presents many challenges for our profession. Historically, veterinarians have not been well-trained in the science of animal welfare, and the robust application of veterinary ethics may be lacking across the curriculum. Veterinarians are still trained by performing aversive procedures on animals, potentially leading to objectification and reduced empathy. Accepted standards of veterinary ethics may sometimes clash with regional or cultural ethical viewpoints around the acceptability of different veterinary procedures such as amputation or euthanasia. In some areas a lack of veterinary regulation may create confusion about the role and responsibilities of veterinarians, and variations in drug availability and licensing may present challenges in anaesthesia and analgesia which contrast with the increasing professional interest in ever more complex veterinary procedures. These multiple and complex issues influence the ways in which we as veterinarians value and treat the animals that we are responsible for. By understanding the interplay between our own ethical decision-making and our impacts on the welfare of the animals we’re responsible for, we can strive to safeguard animal welfare even in challenging situations.

 


Past CVMA Summits: